Some Emerging Guidelines On Picking Out Primary Details Of Health Advice Care For Problems With Diabetes

Gratitude Is Good For The Soul And Helps The Heart, Too Gratitude is clearly associated with physical and mental well-being. It’s linked to better sleep . People who are more grateful seem to have more energy, less depression and possibly even a lower risk of heart disease . Those positive associations Ta hold for both the trait of gratitude that is, being a generally grateful person and the state of gratitude a temporary behavior or feeling, says Philip Watkins , a professor of psychology at Eastern Washington University. But, some of the broader claims about the benefits of gratitude aren’t backed up by science, says Watkins. He says he’s “very pro-gratitude.” But messages “claiming that it’s going to do everything for you, including making you have a longer life and permanently happier,” are not on solid footing, he says. “I wouldn’t question that the positive state of gratitude generally has lots of benefits,” says Don Davis , a psychologist at Georgia State Thanks University. “I think it’s a powerful way to teach people to regulate their emotional state.” anchorBut, he says, “What is in question is how much a minimal dose of gratitude in your week can cause shifts to lead to http://nicecartercoleman.irwomen.net/2016/10/26/all-this-gave-immediate-relief-to-the-archbishop-from-his-lifelong-illness-and-gave-much-fame-and-acclaim-to-the-physician all these benefits.” Davis is an author of the meta-analysis published last year that looked at randomized clinical trials of activities designed to “cultivate a sense of gratefulness,” most of which were short in duration. He and his co-authors wanted to see how the interventions performed on measures of gratitude, anxiety and psychological well-being. Their conclusion: There is “weak evidence for the efficacy of gratitude interventions.” That doesn’t mean that they don’t work for at least some people.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/12/26/505682977/feeling-less-than-grateful-some-people-are-just-wired-that-way?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=news

Bryan Ritchie has been appointed vice president and associate provost for innovation at the University of Notre Dame, effective in March.Ritchie will lead the Universitys new IDEA Center initiative and coordinate innovation and entrepreneurship programs.Ritchie will also direct the development of the universitys new Thomas H. and Diane G. Quinn Hall for Innovation and Change, a 40,000-square-foot facility providing space for up to 30 tech startups. Prior to this Thank You appointment, Ritchie spent time as a tech executive, a startup founder, an academic and university administrator, and a private investor. His career began in the software industry, where he spent 10 years in executive positions at Novell, Dayna Communication, Iomega, and Century Software. In more personnel news: Earlier this month, Indianapolis-based legal tech startup Doxly announced it has hired D. Wayne Poole as its chief operating officer. Poole comes to Doxly from Salesforce, where he served as executive vice president of global sales strategy and operations. Before that, he was senior vice president of global operations at ExactTarget, where he was one of the first 10 employees and integral to growing the company before its eventual sale to Salesforce last year for $2.5 billion. Calling all medical device startups: Johnson & JohnsonInnovation and the Massachusetts Medical Device Development Center (M2D2) are in search of game-changing, early stage medical device and device platform innovations in the areas of cardiovascular, diabetes, neurovascular, surgery, orthopedics, and vision care.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.xconomy.com/indiana/2016/12/27/diabetes-study-hiring-news-growth-mileposts-more-local-tech-news/

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